Quinnipiac among many topics at mayoral debates

The two democratic mayoral debates on  Wednesday Sept. 4  and  Friday Sept. 6,  had many different topics of discussion ranging from town budgets to taxes, but a major concern with both candidates had to do with Quinnipiac students living in residential neighborhoods around Hamden.

The two democratic mayoral debates on Wednesday Sept. 4 and Friday Sept. 6, had many different topics of discussion ranging from town budgets to taxes, but a major concern with both candidates had to do with Quinnipiac students living in residential neighborhoods around Hamden.

By Kim Kerremans

During the debate Friday morning Mayor Curt B. Leng and challenger Councilwoman Lauren Garrett discussed Quinnipiac students living throughout Hamden. Leng stated that the police had to hand out a number of citations to Quinnipiac students the first weekend back to school, for being disruptive to their neighbors.

 

Leng said, “we have a problem in the neighborhoods where bad behavior is occurring in certain student housing locations and it’s a real issue for neighbors because if you buy a house and expect to enjoy a quiet neighborhood.”

 

This is not the case for all students, the majority of student housing is not a problem for the neighbors. Leng said, “I’m really thrilled that the Quinnipiac University’s new leadership, President Judy Olian, her staff and their security forces have really been working hand in hand with is and the police department engaging finally their student life into the mix.”

 

Garret joined the discussion with, “Our police officers need to make sure that they are keeping an eye on underaged drinking. I’m not hearing about any complaints on the underaged drinking.”

 

Leng responded, “I agree with the underaged drinking aspect, that’s a real concern. One of the things that’s happening on a positive end with that is when you get an officer that gets to a large party and breaks it up, the town and the university have a much better line of communication to now send buses when appropriate, to ensure that people are drinking aren’t getting into cars.” 

 

The primary election is Tuesday, Sept. 10, the winner of the primary will be pinned up against Republican nominee Jay Kaye on Nov. 5.